Help, I'm a Rock
The blog post of the beast

According to my dashboard, this is my 666th post. (I’m assuming it’s counting the posts on my creative shit blog and my vent blog as well.)

wehadfacesthen:

Sailors on deck, 1944, a photo by Wayne Miller

wehadfacesthen:

Sailors on deck, 1944, a photo by Wayne Miller

victoriousvocabulary:

FAMELICOSE
[adjective]
often or very hungry.
Etymology: from Latin fames, “hunger” + -ose, a suffix which forms adjectives having a specified quality.
[Peter Diamond]

victoriousvocabulary:

FAMELICOSE

[adjective]

often or very hungry.

Etymology: from Latin fames, “hunger” + -ose, a suffix which forms adjectives having a specified quality.

[Peter Diamond]

beesmygod:

hiccupartist:

who is she

is this a ghost

beesmygod:

hiccupartist:

who is she

is this a ghost

accidentalbeardo:

slorestgreen:

So I found out something today that blew my mind. These pictures are from two Yes album covers, Fragile and Yessongs. I was reading through Roger Dean’s Views when I made a really awesome discovery (for me at least): these pictures are actually telling a story in chronological order. The first two show the front and back of Fragile, where a planet breaks apart over time. From the book:

"The planet disintegrates but the inhabitants have built a spaceship which on the Yessongs cover is shown guiding fragments of the planet as spores through space. The second picture on the Yessongs cover shows these spores impregnating a new planet, introducing life. In the fourth picture the cities evolve.”

As you may know, I am a giant fan of Roger Dean’s work, and it’s really cool to understand his paintings at a deeper level.

PLUS, the narrative of a planet disintegrating while a ship guides its residents to a new world inspired Jon Anderson’s solo album Olias of Sunhillow

stiuvar-elnor:

Rainbow — Sixteenth Century Greensleeves